Webcam live moms

DC4 (Honor) made its way into the world March 29, followed by DC5 (Glory) March 30, 2017.

We all watched with bated breath on April 20, 2017 when Honor become stuck in the nest, was rescued and successfully returned home the next day.

When a zoo in upstate New York set up a live webcam last week of a pregnant giraffe about to give birth, millions of people logged on to You Tube to watch.

Even more tuned in after an online controversy briefly shut down the feed, calling even more attention to the 15-year-old giraffe named April and her calf-to-be.

Two little eaglets hatched in the nest this season, while tens of thousands of excited viewers watched.“We are showing all signs of end of pregnancy but no active labor at this time,” Jordan Patch, the owner of the Harpursville, New York (population 3,543), park tells Us Weekly, noting that giraffe’s instinct is to hide any signs of labor.On Wednesday, April was a “happy camper,” after spending some morning time outside, he told Us.The video cuts out at that point, so the dinner scene is left to viewers’ imaginations.[Sorry, birdwatchers: People think you’re creepy] Here’s the video. Live-cam viewers, of course, saw it all play out, and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported that some were “squeamish or disturbed.” The Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania responded on its Facebook page with a post reminding people that nature “isn’t always kind or pretty.” (Case in point: After a baby bald eagle died on another webcam in Hanover, Pa., its carcass “eventually deteriorated and was slowly stomped into the structure of the nest,” the Post-Gazette reported.) The Pittsburgh cat was probably already dead when it was brought to the nest, the Audubon Society said, though it wasn’t clear whether it met its demise at the claws of an eagle.

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